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Eight Misperceptions About Contemporary Art

So...contemporary!

“More than in any other field, misperceptions about contemporary art keep audiences from effectively engaging it,” writes Alt Wire alumnus Paddy Johnson in her latest L Magazine column.

In an effort to “give the gallery-goer a few tools to make sense of what they see,” Johnson, who also blogs at the wonderful Art Fag City, has constructed a list of myths about contemporary art. We’ve included a crib sheet below, but you really ought to read her rundown of each item.

Paddy Johnson’s “Eight Fallacies About Contemporary Art”:

1. This work generated so much discussion, it must be good!
2. Anything can be art!
3. Value is completely subjective.
4. Anyone could do that.
5. Elitism rules the art world.
6. Pioneering artists are “ahead of their time.”
7. I don’t know enough about art to talk about it.
8. Art professionals wear black.

Source: L Magazine, Art Fag City

Image by My Hobo Soul, Licensed under Creative Commons.

tom hendricks
5/16/2009 7:35:27 PM

The main reason for a lack of concern for contemporary art is that it is not very good. The revolution in the arts and media contains big changes for the visual arts. It's back to basics premise challenges the abuses of modern art and the gallery system. It uses conceptual art to end conceptual art in the groundbreaking and historical conceptual art video called snake oil http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WneXAHfuvwc&feature=channel_page It also attacks modern art for these reasons: 1. it's cold 2. it's disjointed 3. its non communicative and the artist has to explain his work - great art explains itself. 4. It's weird. 5 It's elitist (with that ivory tower trio of artist, gallery, and rich patron) 6. it's technically poor if there is any technique at all. 7 It's pompous and inflated - what used to fit in a small frame, now demands a whole wall or an entire room. 8. It's not functional, not useful, not integrated into our day to day lives. 9 It has no breadth or scope. The old art has painted itself into a corner. The new art challenges all that with it's own list. But no room.