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Electric Vehicles Suck (A Lot of Electricity)

 by Bennett Gordon


Tags: Environment, cars, transportation, electric vehicles, IEEE Spectrum, Bennett Gordon,

Electric CarElectric vehicles are coming to the United States. If steps aren’t taken, though, the cars could cause blackouts and may not help the environment as much as promised. The new EVs need a lot of power to charge, and people want their cars to charge quickly. Turning on just one EV charger "is like adding three new homes to a neighborhood," according to IEEE Spectrum, "and that’s with the air conditioning, lights, and laundry running." If there were an influx of new EV cars, it would put a massive strain on the power grid—especially street-level transformers—and could cause blackouts.

And where does the energy come from to power all those cars? About half of electricity in the United States currently comes from coal power, and that won’t likely change with the introduction of the new cars. So unless big changes are made soon, the new EVs won’t be all that green.

Source: IEEE Spectrum 

maxwell
6/19/2014 6:20:46 AM

Electric car use is more than the past record but as per the use of the car, electricity also required. As per the use of a electric car, proper charging need in proper time. In most of the places, the government make the charging points for the better charging and use the car in a proper way. http://www.monacomotors.com/


jack
2/10/2014 8:37:01 AM

We all know that to control the pollution level of our environment the branded car makers have made an car called electric cars. But, as the cars are supposed to come on to the market one big problem arise that these cars are consuming more electricity and can results blackouts. So, it is preferable to take some necessary precautions against this and stay safe. As we have electric cars or any other cars for the smoother and better running proper maintenance and servicing is much needed as well as repair when needed is an unavoidable issue. I have a Land Rover car and when I face any problem in my car I always go for a http://www.carminesimport.com/land-rover-service/ as I am staying there to get my car repaired.


ed_3
1/14/2010 7:04:05 PM

And how many houses can we run for how long for the fuel we burn in our compact car to go the same distance as the electric goes on that charge. I have never seen more meaningless statistics. But to answer the question posed, let's use solar roadways. The company by the same name is building its first prototype with a U.S. Government grant of $100,000. These folks can use all the support we can give them. http://www.solarroadways.com/main.html


bgordon
1/14/2010 11:38:07 AM

Hi DMD, Great question, I'm just not sure there a great way to answer it. It kind of depends on where people are. In California, for example, IEEE Spectrum estimates that the EV charge would result in just 43 percent of the CO2 as a kilometer's worth of gasoline. So that would be quite significant. But California's power grid is considerably more green than most of the country's. I think the key is, if you're going to go toward more electric vehicles, you've got to make sure the electric power grid is more green. -Bennett


dmd_1
1/14/2010 11:14:58 AM

sorry about the repeats...computer malfunction, but I'd still like to know thx, =)


dmd_1
1/14/2010 11:10:57 AM

great article...the electrical energy required to power three homes sounds like so much...just curious, how does that compare to the equivalent amount of gasoline that is required to run the cars instead? Does the amount of electric energy required to power the cars (equivalent to three homes) exceed or reduce the amount of energy required to power a single gasoline powered car. Is there a savings in energy, carbon footprint, or ???, by employing the electric vehicles or are we simply trading gasoline for electricity and no real savings in energy is taking place? Does anyone know???


dmd_1
1/14/2010 11:09:05 AM

great article...the electrical energy required to power three homes sounds like so much...just curious, how does that compare to the equivalent amount of gasoline that is required to run the cars instead? Does the amount of electric energy required to power the cars (equivalent to three homes) exceed or reduce the amount of energy required to power a single gasoline powered car. Is there a savings in energy, carbon footprint, or ???, by employing the electric vehicles or are we simply trading gasoline for electricity and no real savings in energy is taking place? Does anyone know???


dmd_1
1/14/2010 11:07:55 AM

great article...the electrical energy required to power three homes sounds like so much...just curious, how does that compare to the equivalent amount of gasoline that is required to run the cars instead? Does the amount of electric energy required to power the cars (equivalent to three homes) exceed or reduce the amount of energy required to power a single gasoline powered car. Is there a savings in energy, carbon footprint, or ???, by employing the electric vehicles or are we simply trading gasoline for electricity and no real savings in energy is taking place? Does anyone know???


dmd_1
1/14/2010 11:07:15 AM

great article...the electrical energy required to power three homes sounds like so much...just curious, how does that compare to the equivalent amount of gasoline that is required to run the cars instead? Does the amount of electric energy required to power the cars (equivalent to three homes) exceed or reduce the amount of energy required to power a single gasoline powered car. Is there a savings in energy, carbon footprint, or ???, by employing the electric vehicles or are we simply trading gasoline for electricity and no real savings in energy is taking place? Does anyone know???