Utne Blogs > Media

Free Could Kill Professional Journalism

 by Bennett Gordon


Tags: Media, journalism, free, jobs, Chris Anderson, Spiegel,

Newspaper OnlyGoogle and other internet companies base their businesses on giving things away for free. Chris Anderson, the editor in chief of Wired, has stepped up as the primary cheerleader for this kind of business model. For newspapers, however, this model doesn’t work so well. In an interview with the German newspaper Spiegel, Anderson admits, “In the past, the media was a full-time job. But maybe the media is going to be a part time job. Maybe media won't be a job at all, but will instead be a hobby.”

This doesn’t worry Anderson too much, however. He says, “If something has happened in the world that's important, I'll hear about it. I heard about the protests in Iran before it was in the papers because the people who I subscribe to on Twitter care about those things.”

Source: Spiegel 

Image by Daquella manera, licensed under Creative Commons.

jeff yablon
7/30/2009 10:39:27 AM

As a recovering journalist, I'd like to think I'm better qualified to comment on the events of the day than "just anyone". Maybe I even am. But in a world where the only discourse you're likely to engage in is through your text messaging (and I hate that, by the way), I gotta side with the "headlines are all that really matter and if I want more, I'LL FIND IT". Sadly, this makes me agree with Mr. Anderson. Jeff Yablon Answerguy Central http://answerguy.com


jeff yablon
7/30/2009 10:38:07 AM

As a recovering journalist, I'd like to think I'm better qualified to comment on the events of the day than "just anyone". Maybe I even am. But in a world where the only discourse you're likely to engage in is through your text messaging (and I hate that, by the way), I gotta side with the "headlines are all that really matter and if I want more, I'LL FIND IT". Sadly, this makes me agree with Mr. Anderson. Jeff Yablon Answerguy Central http://answerguy.com


cam m
7/30/2009 10:08:24 AM

Oops! Make that UNsubstantiated and written by someone making a dollar or two a page.


cam m
7/30/2009 10:03:33 AM

There is alot more to news than just the headlines of the day. Sure we can get those but what about the other stories in heath, travel, real estate, finance. Right now there is so much online on all of these topics but if you read carefully it's pretty difficult to find something that is actualy credible and the result of good reporting unless it is coming from a paid source. Certainly there are some excellent citizen journalists but the web is bulging with online content --- mostly unsourced, substantiated, and written by someone making $1 or $2 dollars for 500 words.


brock b.
7/29/2009 11:51:31 PM

It frightens me to see so many negative comments about newspapers. I realize most of the negativity is directed toward large dailies, but we must not forget there are small, community, weekly newspapers in small counties and towns with one traffic light that do actually report the news. We can't just lump ALL newspapers into one category and say good riddance. Your local newspaper has an office where you can see the people who are putting out your news. Local newspaper reporters go to meetings and report to you where your tax dollars are going. If you look inside a newspaper, you can find out who is giving you your news. The same cannot necessarily be said for online news sources. Anyone can whip out a website and call it news and do or say what they want, but who is accountable? Let us not forget that there is more to the world of newspapers than huge corporations trying to make money. For more information, visit this site: http://personalmoneystore.com/moneyblog/2009/07/24/katie-holmes-dance-video/