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How the GOP Can Better Communicate with Women

The Democratic Party, time and time again, win the majority of woman voters, often accusing Republicans for waging a “war on women” for denying rights to abortion and coverage for birth control. Whether this is nothing more than a liberal political tactic or a reality within the GOP is a frequent topic of debate. But there’s no arguing that Republicans need to come up with a strategy to appeal to female voters.

D.C. McAllister wrote in The Federalist that the GOP must identify which women could be most receptive to the GOP agenda. From the book What Women Really Want: How American Women are Quietly Erasing Political, Racial, Class and Religious Lines to Change the Way We Live, by Celinda Lake, McAllister cited the eight types of female voters (or non-voters):

1. The Feminist Champion: a politically engaged liberal, mostly secular and pro-choice, devoted to her career and community, strongly motivated by values of equality and opportunity

2. The Suburban Caretaker: married with children, often spiritual and religious, highly invested in moral standards

3. The Alpha Striver: a businesswoman who views herself as an agent of change, trying to have it all – in the conference room and at PTA meetings

4. The Religious Crusader: views issues as “right vs. wrong” rather than “right vs. left”; church-going and often pro-life

5. The Multicultural Maverick: young, single, urban, an individualist, liberal yet distrusting of politicians

6. The Waitress Mom: blue-collar worker who seeks a balance in life and financial opportunities for her children, often a person of faith, swing voter

7. The Senior Survivor: 65 years or older, security- and health-conscious, a political centrist who tends to vote in favor of the incumbent or status quo

8. The Alienated Single: not doing well economically, politically disengaged, young, least religious and least educated, usually not registered to vote

She noted that the Religious Crusader and Suburban Caretaker are already likely Republican supporters, but now the party must first make an effort to reach the Waitress Mom and the Alpha Striver, with a secondary focus on the Alienated Single and Senior Survivor. It’s not a matter of “pandering or identity politics or tailoring policy to meet the desires of a faction,” McAllister cautioned. Rather, it’s about “crafting a message and wisely talking to voters in a relevant and meaningful way that will convince them to vote for the GOP and conservative principles.”

Which, for the midterm elections, might not be going so well. In this video, Stephen Colbert highlights the stereotypes politicians often implement when reaching out to women, with this TV commercial subtly suggesting, “Let him take care of the hard stuff.”