Brazil’s Cultural Defenders


| 2/19/2008 4:41:14 PM


Tags: Brazil, Music, Tradition, Culture, ,

The cultural history of Brazil is in danger. The roots of the country’s world-famous music, as well as its folk medicine, storytelling, dances, and visual arts, lie in traditions that could die out as the older generation ages. The government-sponsored Griô Action program is designed to protect this endangered culture by finding the keepers of historical knowledge and helping them pass on their music, games, and traditions to a new generation.

In this video, Elizabeth Dwoskin, author of “Slave Songs in Brazil” in the March-April issue of Utne Reader, talks about the Griô Action program and defenders of Brazil’s traditions.

Bennett Gordon

 

To hear more Brazilian music from the members of Griô Action, click on the links below. 

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titop_2
3/7/2008 3:09:16 PM

The thing is, the traditions are changing. Endemic sounds are combining with global music trends. I picked up a copy of What's Happening in Pernambuco, a compilation of new music from Northeastern Brazil that serves as a good example of this tendency. Good info. about the traditional scenes these artists are born from, too. Luaka Bop, who released the comp, included this in their Brazil Classics series, which has done a great job of tracing the roots of Brazilian music. Even if it is a U.S. label, they seem to be working as conservators, too.


titop_1
3/7/2008 3:07:48 PM

The thing is, the traditions are changing. Endemic sounds are combining with global music trends. I picked up a copy of What's Happening in Pernambuco, a compilation of new music from Northeastern Brazil that serves as a good example of this tendency. Good info. about the traditional scenes these artists are born from, too. Luaka Bop, who released the comp, included this in their Brazil Classics series, which has done a great job of tracing the roots of Brazilian music. Even if it is a U.S. label, they seem to be working as conservators, too.


daniel ted feliciano_2
2/23/2008 12:06:49 AM

The whole process of preserving one country's cultural history is a very hard job to do. The passing away of tradition is inevitable. http://bestcartoonblog.blogspot.com/