Eagles and Condors - Heartland

Living a different dream in the Amazonian rainforest

| November / December 2006


According to a legend told in parts of South America, we are living at the end of the 10th pachacuti. Whenever a pachacuti-a 500-year cycle-shifts, the earth rumbles to remind people of their rightful place. It was predicted that the eagle people (the people of the mind from the north) would become highly evolved intellectually but spiritually bereft. The condor people (the people of the heart in the south) would be materially deprived but spiritually advanced. According to prophecy, at the end of the 10th pachacuti, the eagles and the condors will come together to bring the world back into balance.

The Achuar tribe lives in Ecuador's Amazonian rainforest, just north of the Peruvian border. Since the area has seen very few outsiders, save for a handful of missionaries, the tribe's traditions are intact, its culture is vibrant, and its members continue to sustain themselves in one of the few untouched stretches of rainforest left in the world.

Achuar elders had a series of visions in the early 1990s, however, that convinced them that their tribe's way of life was about to be endangered by outside forces. This threat would arrive in the form of oil drilling, which has devastated adjacent indigenous peoples.

The Achuar took the radical measure of issuing a call, communicated through dreams and visions, to potential partners in the modern world. They hoped to reach people who understood the value of an unmolested rainforest and who could help the Achuar develop a sustainable economic infrastructure that would both protect it and be true to the tribe's traditional structure and mores.



The Pachamama (an indigenous word meaning the earth, the sky, the universe, and all time) Alliance formed 10 years ago in answer to the call. Funded by members and private donors, the group aims to preserve the world's rainforests by empowering their natural custodians, contributing to the creation of a new global vision of equity and sustainability for all.

In late August, I traveled to the Achuar tribal territory with the alliance. As we were told at the outset, this was not a vacation, though there were many sybaritic moments; it was not adventure travel, though we certainly stretched. It was a pilgrimage.