How to Reach for the Sun


| July 3, 2002 Issue


I n a classic case of grassroots activism, Greenpeace organizer Kristin Casper has rallied more than 200 volunteers to successfully educate San Franciscans about two solar power propositions on the upcoming ballot.

Writing in Hope magazine, Audrey Schulman describes how Casper stumbled upon the two ballot initiatives spurring the use of clean energy: Proposition B, which would allow the city to issue $100 million in revenue bonds for new active solar power facilities; and Proposition H, which would make it possible for the city "to enact future clean-energy projects without a citywide vote each time." As well-informed as she was, Casper knew that if she hadn't heard about these resolutions, few others in the city would have heard of them either--and it would be doubtful they would pass.

Rather than hope for widespread media coverage, Casper decided to take grassroots action. She hired five students from Green Corps, "a Boston-based field school for environmental campaign organizers," to help educate city residents. The six of them found an army of volunteers all over the city who plastered 1500 signs and called 50,000 voters.
--Sara V. Buckwitz
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