How to Wreck a Planet


| 6/9/2011 10:22:54 AM


Tags: energy, natural resources, crisis, TomDispatch, environment, Michael T. Klare,

 how-to-wreck-a-planet 

This article was originally published at TomDispatch.com.

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Here’s the good news about energy: thanks to rising oil prices and deteriorating economic conditions worldwide, the International Energy Agency (IEA) reports that global oil demand will not grow this year as much as once assumed, which may provide some temporary price relief at the gas pump. In its May Oil Market Report, the IEA reduced its 2011 estimate for global oil consumption by 190,000 barrels per day, pegging it at 89.2 million barrels daily. As a result, retail prices may not reach the stratospheric levels predicted earlier this year, though they will undoubtedly remain higher than at any time since the peak months of 2008, just before the global economic meltdown. Keep in mind that this is the good news.

As for the bad news: the world faces an array of intractable energy problems that, if anything, have only worsened in recent weeks. These problems are multiplying on either side of energy’s key geological divide: below ground, once-abundant reserves of easy-to-get “conventional” oil, natural gas, and coal are drying up; above ground, human miscalculation and geopolitics are limiting the production and availability of specific energy supplies. With troubles mounting in both arenas, our energy prospects are only growing dimmer.

Here’s one simple fact without which our deepening energy crisis makes no sense: the world economy is structured in such a way that standing still in energy production is not an option. In order to satisfy the staggering needs of older industrial powers like the United States along with the voracious thirst of rising powers like China, global energy must grow substantially every year. According to the projections of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE), world energy output, based on 2007 levels, must rise 29% to 640 quadrillion British thermal units by 2025 to meet anticipated demand. Even if usage grows somewhat more slowly than projected, any failure to satisfy the world’s requirements produces a perception of scarcity, which also means rising fuel prices. These are precisely the conditions we see today and should expect for the indefinite future.

cokolol
6/17/2011 4:00:00 PM

http://www.flockee.com/opinion/adolf-hitler-leadership-style-vs-modern-leaders-style-1/


cokolol
6/17/2011 3:58:54 PM

Please help to prevent that another Hitler is borned. Just that. Anythink else doesn't matters. Read this to realize why i'm writting this down: http://www.flockee.com/opinion/adolf-hitler-leadership-style-vs-modern-leaders-style-1/


karen
6/10/2011 11:15:06 AM

I just wanted to say that there are developments in energy production that could alleviate the issues mentioned in the article. Explore something called the "Bloombox". It is a stand alone energy generator currently being tested in large scale organizations such as Google. Although all of the issues listed are valid, I hold out hope and optimism that we can overcome the old way of providing energy and embrace a new, cheap, and clean way! Lets educate our government and energy regulators, ok?