Christian Goth Culture Online


| 11/28/2007 1:43:26 PM


Tags: Christian Goths, Gothic Christianity, Christian Goth Subculture, Goth Sub Culture,

Goth culture often elicits memories of moody, black-clad teenagers skulking through high school hallways.  Devout religious practice and belief doesn’t fit easily with the stereotype. Maybe Satanism, but certainly not Christianity.

Gothic Christian youth are out there, though, worshiping Jesus from beneath their dark makeup. The fall issue of Geez (article not available online) points readers toward the strong presence that gothic Christians have on the web. Even the website names illuminate their dark form of religion: TheFirstChurchOfTheLivingDead.com,  ShaddowCross.com, ThoseWhoMourn.com, and BloodGod.org among them.

Most of the sites focus on practicing Christianity rather than gothic culture. An overarching theme seems to be a search for acceptance, and a belief that God doesn’t judge based on image. According to ChristianGoth.com, “Christ died for everyone, even Gothic people. God doesn’t look at the outer appearance, only the heart.” —Sarah Pumroy 

archangel azrael_2
11/2/2009 7:36:22 PM

Goth is a music and fashion thing, not a religion-based lifestyle. Everyone can be in black, wear dark lipstick, walk wearing combat boots and still hang out at churches. Saviour Machine pulled off that mind-changing stunt when they popped up in the music scene. I love Jesus, i love GOD, i love Heaven, everything. Yes, i sin, but at least, my faith in them is powerful. The norm rarely sees what's within a Goth kid. Notions and statements that conclude Goth as a lifestyle concerning Satanism is greatly idiotic and literal. Yes, there are indeed Satanic Goth people, but there are Catholics, Christians, Jews, Muslims and Buddhists involved in the scene. I'm a Roman Catholic, and my dumb 14-year-old classmates don't see that. They are even more demonic than the way i look. Satanism and Anti-Christian ways of life are promoted in the Black Metal scene. If Goths are indeed Satanic, we are not the only ones....this also says that there are many Christian Goths, the same as those who are Christians wo are non-Goths.


gene_5
10/23/2009 12:04:59 PM

Answers Continued: I'm new here and ran out of space I guess, two more answers: My parent did not choose this for me, my mother was a hardcore Christian zealot which turned me AWAY from Christianity, and she hated gothism, felt it was Satanic and gave me grief over it. Now I don't answer to her or anyone like her. I have one child that is not goth, and the other child thinks and behaves like me very naturally. I let them be who they are and walk the road they choose. I hope this helps the curious. Best regards


gene_5
10/23/2009 12:00:16 PM

For those of you who have aseked questions about gothism, I will try to answer them from my perspective as much as I can. First of all Gothism is not a religion. It is a lifestyle that is different in many aspects and does not condemn anyone. There are satanic goths, christian goths and all sorts in between. Just like being a cowboy is not a religion but a subculture. As for holidays, I personally shun Christmas because it is steeped in paganism that has nothing to do with Jesus, and is admittedly not his brithday to begin with. It is a collection of rituals that in modern times centers around the get way of live and commercialism more than anything. I was always gothic, I didn't choose it. I had oddball tastes and interests as well as tendencies from birth. I actually began doing certain things and found that all others who did them fell under the definition of Goth. I love black clothing, victorianism, goth music, candles, and a long list of other things. As for the challenges, I don't hide being gothic. I wear jewelry and clothing all the time, including a black jacket with velvet and a black rose ring. People can like it or not, it is me. I get compliments, persecution and ridicule, but I have no use for the conformity rules of society. I live for me, not for someone who will see me for 15 seconds, then move on with his life. I get looked at oddly and called mentally ill, satanic, childish and immature, but I laugh most of it off.


merciful+martyr
5/1/2008 12:07:31 AM

I became "gothique" when i enterred a very dark and depressed period in my life, where i finally accepted the fact that i didnt fit in due to my broad insight, deep interests in the more shunned things of life, art, poetry and the importance of words, dreams and the mind. I grew up christian though, and i love the lord Jesus Christ more than anything, because he bled, suffered and died an awful death on a crucifix so that my sins can be forgiven, and he was an outcast just like me. His own people diddnt like Him, and people loved to mock Him and detested Him because He taught some radical teachings that no one had ever heard before, and could never compare to.


danny_2
4/3/2008 4:23:36 PM

Like many things, its in the eye of the beholder. True goth is usually a state of mind about passion and beauty. Love, romance, art, philosophy, poetry, its about grabbing life by the balls in a different way, but grabbing none the less. Personally what attracted me to the culture was the emotional part. I adored the romance of the culture, the ideals, ect. There's actually one line from a gothic/metal band that comes to mind: "I will fear not the flames that to passion are tame, not nearly the same searing pain". Obviously a dark, not always morbid, but dark, state of mind, but artistic at the same time make up a lot of what gothic is. For instance, William Shakespear. He wrote some of the most powerful and immortal works of all time. Very sad stories, very dark, but at the same time, amazingly beautiful. And that's a large part of it. Dark beauty. And the expression of that beauty. Its an attraction to that side of life. At least, that makes up a large part of it for me. I know others who love the culture for similar or completly different reasons.


danny_1
4/3/2008 4:23:26 PM

Like many things, its in the eye of the beholder. True goth is usually a state of mind about passion and beauty. Love, romance, art, philosophy, poetry, its about grabbing life by the balls in a different way, but grabbing none the less. Personally what attracted me to the culture was the emotional part. I adored the romance of the culture, the ideals, ect. There's actually one line from a gothic/metal band that comes to mind: "I will fear not the flames that to passion are tame, not nearly the same searing pain". Obviously a dark, not always morbid, but dark, state of mind, but artistic at the same time make up a lot of what gothic is. For instance, William Shakespear. He wrote some of the most powerful and immortal works of all time. Very sad stories, very dark, but at the same time, amazingly beautiful. And that's a large part of it. Dark beauty. And the expression of that beauty. Its an attraction to that side of life. At least, that makes up a large part of it for me. I know others who love the culture for similar or completly different reasons.


courtney_1
3/5/2008 1:36:47 AM

Can anyone tell me what Goth is without referring to aesthetics or music? Something profound about Goth?


mother star
3/4/2008 11:09:10 AM

A. 1. I chose it because it is the Truth. I saw my grandmother get up out of her wheelchair and walk in a small unkown church when I was eight years old. They said "In the name of Jesus..." and she was healed. Nobody else can duplicate that. You can say things you find offensive about it, you can give lengthy lists of the failures of professing christians to live up to the perfection of their own moral code, but you can't erase faith built on first-hand experiences like that. 2. We have things called "gatherings" where Christian people who are gothic can go and find company with at least somewhat like-minded people. Gothic christianity has exactly the same tenents, customs, etc. as Christianity in any other culture, we just have a different culture that's all. 3. I have left everything at some point, including my gothic culture to follow the God (Jesus) I know and choose to love with my life. I realized that my calling was in this culture and He made me different on purpose, and realizing this freed me to go back home to my gothic lifestyle. Basically, it effects every major decision in my life and some small ones. 4. It is very difficult to live in a world that calls indifference "love". If you don't care what a person does so long as they are comfortable with it, that doesn't mean you love and accept them. It just means you don't care about them. There's no one you deeply care for that you would non-chalantly watch destroying their own life and say "It's all good if they don't, care I don't." I can't stand the hypocrisy of post-modernism. 5. If your parents chose your faith for you, it's not really your faith. No one can choose true Christianity for someone else. You have to pursue Jesus for yourself or it doesn't count. 6. See the answer to question 1. There's more I could say, but I'd be writing a long book... 7. Today, I wouldn't. I


robert smith
12/9/2007 11:21:30 PM

Maggie, unless you're trying to reach out to someone from the 3rd century in this comment field, it sounds like you might be thinking of something different. "Gothic Christianity," in terms of this article, isn't a unique religion so much as run-of-the-mill "Christianity" (whatever that means) overlaid with "Goth" fashion. That kind of "Goth" is black-clad, overwrought, http://www.thecure.com/


maggie_1
12/7/2007 9:13:16 AM

Hi I was wondering if someone wouldn't mind answering some questions regarding gothic christianity. Basically I need someone who follows this religion. I am writing a paper for my world religions class. I could choose any religion, not mine of course, that interested me. I came across Gothic Christianity, and thought it would be interesting. if someone doesn't mind answering the below 10 questions... 1.why did you choose this religion? 2.What are the important holidays and traditions of this religion? 3.How has religion shaped your life? 4.what are the challenges, if any, to practicing this particular religion? 5.How did you choose your religion? Was it forced upon you by your parents or did you choose it on your own? 6.How can one choose or say their own religion Is right? 7.If you had to choose a religion other than your own, what would it be? 8.Do you think children should be able to choose their own religion? 9.will you give your children the freedom to choose their own? 10.How does your religion differ from the others that are out there


gadigan_4
11/30/2007 5:37:34 PM

It means that even if You (the universal You) think they are weird/ugly/inferior/whatever, they know that "God" doesn't see them that way. Which "He" shouldn't, not if he wants to live up to his rep.


gadigan_3
11/30/2007 5:37:18 PM

It means that even if You (the universal You) think they are weird/ugly/inferior/whatever, they know that "God" doesn't see them that way. Which "He" shouldn't, not if he wants to live up to his rep.


steve thorngate_4
11/28/2007 10:04:27 PM

The language you quoted from christiangoth.com seems very odd--Christ died EVEN for them and doesn't care what they look like? Isn't that pretty much conceding that it's weird/ugly/inferior/whatever to be goth? I remember there being goth bands and goth kids when I used to go to Cornerstone, a sort of fringe evangelical music festival in Illinois. Figured it would be a brief fad--looks like I was wrong.


steve thorngate_3
11/28/2007 10:04:26 PM

The language you quoted from christiangoth.com seems very odd--Christ died EVEN for them and doesn't care what they look like? Isn't that pretty much conceding that it's weird/ugly/inferior/whatever to be goth? I remember there being goth bands and goth kids when I used to go to Cornerstone, a sort of fringe evangelical music festival in Illinois. Figured it would be a brief fad--looks like I was wrong.