The Voice of the Divine Feminine

Finding the divine feminine can be as simple as removing the layers of doubt that limit us.


| September 2014



Black Madonna statue

The Black Madonna is a prominent symbol of the divine feminine within Catholic tradition.

Photo by Fotolia/lamio

Both a spiritual memoir and a guide for readers to embrace the sacredness of their bodies and minds, Reveal (Hay House, 2014) by Meggan Watterson focuses on the need for a spirituality that encourages embodiment. Watterson found the spiritual home she sought through stories and voices of the divine feminine. In this excerpt from the introduction, she presents the seven-layered approach she took to owning her spirituality.

"Descent is not about finding light but about going into the darkness and befriending it. If we remain there long enough, it takes on its own luminosity. It will reveal everything to us."—Sue Monk Kidd

"Do you know who you are?" the shaman asked.

A thick silence filled the short distance between us.

"Do you know who you are?" she repeated, her eyes locking mine so forcefully she might as well have put her hands on either side of my face. Responses were racing through me like the reels of a slot machine. But I remained silent as huge tears started to slide down my cheeks.

I knew who I was, but I had no idea how to express it. I didn’t know how to mirror on the outside the truth of who I was within.