Laughing Into Darkness


| 12/26/2013 11:04:00 AM


Tags: Mark Twain, Comedy, Humor, Gilded Age, Inequality, Tom Dispatch, Lewis Lapham.,

 

Why no Mark Twain for our second Gilded Age?

This article originally appeared at TomDispatch and will appear in "Comedy," the Winter 2014 issue of Lapham's Quarterly.

Well, humor is the great thing, the saving thing, after all. -- Mark Twain

Twain for as long as I’ve known him has been true to his word, and so I’m careful never to find myself too far out of his reach. The Library of America volumes of his Collected Tales, Sketches, Speeches, and Essays (1852–1910) stand behind my desk on a shelf with the dictionaries and the atlas. On days when the news both foreign and domestic is moving briskly from bad to worse, I look to one or another of Twain’s jests to spring the trap or lower a rope, to summon, as he is in the habit of doing, a blast of laughter to blow away the “peacock shams” of the world’s “colossal humbug.”

Laughter was Twain’s stock in trade, and for 30 years as bestselling author and star attraction on America’s late-nineteenth-century lecture stage, he produced it in sufficient quantity to make bearable the acquaintance with grief that he knew to be generously distributed among all present in the Boston Lyceum or a Tennessee saloon, in a Newport drawing room as in a Nevada brothel. Whether the audience was sober or drunk, topped with top hats or snared in snakebitten boots, Twain understood it likely in need of a remedy to cover its losses.