RNC: Four Things Democrats Should Learn from Palin’s Speech


| 9/4/2008 10:47:38 AM


Tags: Politics, Election 2008, Republican National Convention, RNC, speeches, Sarah Palin, Democrats, wedge issues, abortion,

Sarah Palin delivered a rousing convention speech that will no doubt add to her likability quotient among the not-yet-saved. Plus, she’s really good with a sarcastic flourish. So what’s a jittery Democrat to do? Here are four strategies the Democrats should take away from last night:

1. Ignore the condescending impulse to go easy on a woman. Unleash Joe Biden on the self-proclaimed hockey-mom pitbull in the VP debates.

2. Repeat the following over and over: “Parents: If your daughter is raped, Sarah Palin wants to force her to give birth to her assailants’ child.” Another rendition goes like this: “Sarah Palin wants to force victims of incest to give birth to their sibling/child.”

3. Last night showed that the Republican strategy for dealing with the country’s woes is to rail against big government, blast taxes on the rich, and wave signs reading “Prosperity.” On the Palin front: Remind voters that her state’s economy runs on two things: federal funding largesse and record oil prices that are draining Americans wallets at the pump.

4. Remind voters what happened the last time they went for the likable, folksy option with a sarcastic jab behind every smirk, a wedge issue to dodge every policy discussion, and the right wing of the Republican party in pocket. George W. Bush may have been nixed from the Republican National Convention’s stage, but his spirit (and Rove’s) was alive and well in the presence of Sarah Palin.

Watch Palin's speech:

Alex Cooper_1
9/11/2008 6:00:50 PM

Clearly, you are not Palin's advocate. Who do you advocate for then? Does your disagreement with her beliefs and values have to lead to personal attacks? Or is this your definition of politics? "They're going to do it anyway so I might as well be first." You would be more persuasive if you took a more balanced view. But then again, you might not be capable of that. This is a privilege of our liberty: you are allowed to sound like a fool because you have the freedom of speech.


Alex Cooper_1
9/11/2008 6:00:25 PM

Clearly, you are not Palin's advocate. Who do you advocate for then? Does your disagreement with her beliefs and values have to lead to personal attacks? Or is this your definition of politics? "They're going to do it anyway so I might as well be first." You would be more persuasive if you took a more balanced view. But then again, you might not be capable of that. This is a privilege of our liberty: you are allowed to sound like a fool because you have the freedom of speech.


kap
9/6/2008 6:54:03 PM

Would like to add to #3 or possibly add a 5: Emphasize that her family is in the oil business. Talk about special interests! If you want more drilling and pipelines to help support her family with no focus on alternatives-vote for "McPalin", or maybe better "McPain".


Jim Rosenberg
9/5/2008 7:02:28 AM

Regarding those "Prosperity" signs, "Prosperity" has actually become kind of a code word within the ranks of right wing conservatives over the past few years: http://tinyurl.com/2ced35 In short, it's not some innocuous term and the people behind it have a very clear, right wing agenda. Search for "Americans for Prosperity" and "Prosperity Project." Once you get off the sites that belong to those who have co-opted the term, you will find some interesting players and some very conservative views. In short, you'll learn a lot. I don't know if AFP was actually behind the signs, but it wouldn't surprise me. Here is a video showing McCain being booed at an Americans for Prosperity rally in Michigan earlier this year: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-nVJGsTd... Apparently, they've made peace with the idea of John McCain as the GOP nominee now -- but it's not as if AFP would have ever backed the Democratic nominee anyway.