The Case for Hope, Continued


| 5/21/2013 4:40:39 PM


Tags: Activism, Hope, Iraq War, Occupy Wall Street, Arab Spring, Idle No More, Antiwar Movement, Tom Dispatch, Rebecca Solnit.,

Occupy-Hopeful-Signs 

Rebecca Solnit on injustice, struggle, and the hope that pushes us to action. “Everything is in motion,” she writes, “and sometimes we are ourselves that movement.”  


Rebecca Solnit As in 2004 and 2008, Rebecca Solnit and her blue-state henchwomen and men will probably invade northern Nevada on election week to swing with one of the most swinging states in the union. She is, however, much more excited about 350.org’s anti-oil-company campaign and the ten thousand faces of Occupy now changing the world. Rebecca Solnit is the author of 15 books, including two due out next year, and a regular contributor to TomDispatch.com. She lives in San Francisco, is from kindergarten to graduate school a product of the once-robust California public educational system, and her book A Paradise Built in Hell is the One City/One Book choice of the San Francisco Public Library this fall. Solnit’s latest book, The Faraway Nearby, will be published in June. She was named an Utne Visionary in 2010 


This post originally appeared at Tom Dispatch.  

Ten years ago, my part of the world was full of valiant opposition to the new wars being launched far away and at home -- and of despair. And like despairing people everywhere, whether in a personal depression or a political tailspin, these activists believed the future would look more or less like the present. If there was nothing else they were confident about, at least they were confident about that. Ten years ago, as a contrarian and a person who prefers not to see others suffer, I tried to undermine despair with the case for hope.

A decade later, the present is still contaminated by the crimes of that era, but so much has changed. Not necessarily for the better -- a decade ago, most spoke of climate change as a distant problem, and then it caught up with us in 10,000 ways. But not entirely for the worse either -- the vigorous climate movement we needed arose in that decade and is growing now. If there is one thing we can draw from where we are now and where we were then, it’s that the unimaginable is ordinary, and the way forward is almost never a straight path you can glance down, but a labyrinth of surprises, gifts, and afflictions you prepare for by accepting your blind spots as well as your intuitions.

gerard hill
5/22/2013 10:37:22 PM

"The arc of the moral universe is long,but it bends towards justice"......first recorded by an abolitionist in the Civil War and later by Martin Luther King.Wonderful piece.Maybe our childrens children will see it all come to fruition.