Buddha and the Blogosphere

By Staff

<p>Political blogging isn’t known for respectful, civil debate. Most people who thrive in the blogosphere are aggressive and contentious, welcoming a tone of argument and escalation. R.J. Eskow, who blogs for the often-angry <i>
<a title=”Huffington Post” href=”http://www.huffingtonpost.com/” target=”_blank”>Huffington Post</a>,</i> doesn’t want to be one of these insult-hurling pundits. Eskow is bucking the raging-blogger tradition, seeking to hold himself to a higher standard.</p>
<p>Specifically, Eskow is trying to follow the ethical and spiritual teachings of Buddhist tradition. <a title=”Writing in the western Buddhist magazine <I>Tricycle</I>” href=”http://www.tricycle.com/issues/editors_pick/4189-1.html” target=”_blank”>Writing in the western Buddhist magazine <i>Tricycle</i>
</a>, Eskow questions the tension between blogger rage and Buddhist serenity:</p>
<p>
<i>Can a person maintain equanimity and stay in the political debate? And what about the precept of right speech? It forbids lying, of course. But it also means no harsh words, rumor-mongering, or frivolous talk.</i>
</p>
<p>
<i>In today’s political dialogue, what’s left?</i>
</p>
<p>Eskow attempts to cultivate spiritual discipline without sacrificing his rhetorical efficacy. Eskow’s inability to maintain calm raises issues fundamental to both spiritual integrity and political change: Which is more important, faithfulness or effectiveness? More importantly, is there a third way? <i>–Steve Thorngate</i>
</p>
<p>
</p>

UTNE
UTNE
In-depth coverage of eye-opening issues that affect your life.