Michel Nischan: Food Justice Advocate

Michel Nischan, co-founder of Wholesome Wave, talks about the Double Value Coupon Program, which makes SNAP benefits twice as valuable at farmers markets.
By Suzanne Lindgren
November/December 2012

Michel Nischan
Photo Courtesy of Wholesome Wave


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Each year, tens of billions of dollars enter the American economy with a single purpose: to be spent on food. Though no one can say where money from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, once known as food stamps) goes, exactly, it’s a safe bet that most of it finds its way to the coffers of multinational food manufacturing companies and corporate farms. But what if that money re-circulated through local economies via small farms? What if that money were spent not on cheap, processed food, but on the healthy fare found at farmers’ markets? Such questions became the seeds of Wholesome Wave, founded by Michel Nischan and Gus Schumacher in 2007.

The nonprofit’s founding program doubled the value of SNAP benefits at farmers’ markets. In theory, it could be a hard sell getting people to give up Cheetos, Oreos, and all of those deliciously processed “o”s in favor of kale and cucumbers. Nischan has a different story to tell. At markets, “the SNAP and the WIC people were showing up when it was sleeting and raining and snowing and cold when, pardon the expression, all the white people were staying home because the weather was bad. Underserved community members were going because it was their only healthy food access. The farmers were blown away by that.”

Quality of produce has been the main draw for roughly 90 percent of participants. Also important were the markets’ acceptance of SNAP benefits and the desire to support local farmers and businesses. “It’s not that folks in these communities maybe want the access,” says Michel Nischan. “They’re desperate for it, they just can’t afford it. When [markets] provide affordability with something as simple as a two-for-one sale, they come in droves and they continue to come after the benefit is gone.”

The real benefit, of course, is health. With the Double Value Coupon Program at over 400 markets nationwide, the potential for better health is high. But Wholesome Wave isn’t done yet—new programs like the Fruit and Vegetable Prescription Program and Healthy Food Commerce Initiative are primed to open the doors to health even wider.








Post a comment below.

 

Dee
12/6/2012 4:45:01 AM
Thank you Suzanne Lindgren for Posting this article.People up on Cory Booker Twitter has such Negative and Prejudice views of folks on SNAP. Kids come into my classroom daily hungry from all walks of life. I make sure I have additional food 2 feed them. People (Our Country) has become so divided among Economic lines that they don't care about hungry children, diabled vets,elderly, single parents,low wage workers etc. All you read up on twitter is they need 2 get up and work, or buy healthier foods, or that they saw Steaks and Breakfast food in a SNAP recipients buggy. This is the first Blog I see logical and compassionate comments. Thank You and keep opening farmers markets.

Suzanne Lindgren
12/5/2012 9:11:31 PM
Thanks for pointing that out. Wholesome Wave has an interactive map at http://wholesomewave.org/dvcp/

Suzanne Lindgren
12/5/2012 9:10:46 PM
Wholesome Wave has an interactive map at http://wholesomewave.org/dvcp/ Check out their site for even more ways to help, and thanks!

Paula Smith
12/5/2012 6:41:42 PM
How can we find out if this is in our town? Who do we call? Then how can we help? Paula Smith Wichita Ks.

Robert LaCoe
12/5/2012 3:57:21 PM
I googled "farmers markets" and it gave me about 12 locations near me. I live in a small town, pop 12,000, in East Texas, so I am sure you will find more if you live near large population centers.

Karen Marie
12/5/2012 2:05:45 PM
Well -- where in the U.S. are these 400 markets? Great idea, but getting it out to those on SNAP seems like it'd be key. There should've been a link within this article going to a page where these farmers' markets are located.








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