Pagan Celebration of Yule

With traditions drawing from their ancestral past, Pagans welcome the season of Yule with wassail, pine trees, and various other festivities.


| December 2013



Yule Traditions

Yule begins with the Arra Geola moon, which grows full in late November or the first few weeks of December, and the season then continues for two lunar months.

Photo By yelgi/Fotolia.com

To Walk a Pagan Path (Llewellyn Publications, 2013) by Alaric Albertsson offers practical tips for incorporating Pagan spirituality into every day life and customizing a sacred calendar customized to your beliefs, lifestyle, and environment. The following excerpt from “Yule,” details Pagan celebration of Yule season.

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Celebration of Yule

Yule is often confused with the winter solstice, but the former is a season while the latter is a precise moment in time.

Yule begins with the Arra Geola moon, which grows full in late November or the first few weeks of December, and the season then continues for two lunar months.

For Saxon Pagans (as well as Pagans from many other paths), the celebration of the Yuletide usually does not actually begin until Mothers’ Night (the solstice) and continues for a week or two after this. I celebrate for twelve days, from Mothers’ Night to New Year’s Day, but I have been invited to Yule feasts held as late as mid-January. For that matter, I have attended Yule feasts that took place ten days or more before the solstice. And this was entirely appropriate, for Yule is a season.