March-April 2014 Table of Contents 

Intergenerational Activism

 

Have You Given Up?
Utne readers weigh in on the state of activism and activists in America today by Eric Utne, Jay Ogilvy, and Brad Edmondson, special to Utne Reader

Action as Healing Tonic
Protesting Keystone XL with love—and pie, by Shannon Wianecki, from Spirituality & Health

The Art of Youth Resistance
A journey to reclaim Aboriginal Treaty Rights by Terrence Hall, from Cultural Survival Quarterly

Elbows Deep
Meet the Ozarks' unlikely environmentalists by Jake Abrahamson, from Sierra


Fracking Our Future

Pennsylvania Fracking

Fracked
Before the natural gas boom, the woods and rivers of Pennsylvania had a life of their own by S. Harrison Grigg, from Guernica

Welcome to Frackville
Inside the Marcellus Shale feeding frenzy by Kim Sorvig, from Landscape Architecture Magazine

The Frack Fight Goes Global
From China to Bulgaria, drillers are discovering shale—and opposition by Danny Chivers, from New Internationalist


Emerging Ideas   

 

Onslaught of Autism
A mom's crusade could help unravel a scientific mystery by Jane Kay, from Environmental Health News

Bright Kids, Small City
With fewer opportunities in big cities, many young people are choosing to stay home by Nona Willis Aronowitz, from The American Prospect


Gleanings 

Business Social Networking 

All LinkedIn with Nowhere to Go
An Escher staircase masquerading as a career ladder by Ann Friedman, from The Baffler

Oval Intention
One tent, generations of happy campers by Kim Todd, from High Country News


Mindful Living

Mentoring for the Earth
Working together to mend a torn culture by Mark Morey, from Permaculture Activist

Savior of the Sole
The emotional, even religious, side of neoliberal capitalism by Lucia Hulsether, from Religion & Politics


Mixed Media

The Book of Lamentations
The American Psychiatric Association's latest dystopian novel by Sam Kriss, from The New Inquiry


Reviews:

Film
Chaplin's Masterpiece Revisited: a review of City Lights: Criterion Collection
The Mystery of Vivian Maier: a review of Finding Vivian Maier
A Deeply Haunting Portrait: a review of The Missing Picture

Music
No Need to Rush Good Music: a review of Holly by Nick Waterhouse

Visual Art
The Sublime Art of James Turrell

Books
Selling Progress: a review of Tomorrow-Land by Joseph Tirella
Learning How to Swim: a review of Beyond Magenta by Susan Kuklin
The Brush is Mightier than the Sword: a review of Art that Changed the World from DK Publishing


Editor’s Note
by Christian Williams 

Forward 
by Eric Utne


Dispatches from: 
Resurgence & Ecologist (Reef Art Madness)
The Spark (Rent the Farm)
Science News (Fighting Bacteria with Biomimicry)
Yes! Magazine (Unprecedented Victories, Unlikely Allies) 
In These Times (The Other TPP)
Monitor on Psychology (Trying to Think Outside the Box? Don't Clean Your Desk.) 





Post a comment below.

 

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:46:59 AM
Sorry, your site won't let me include paragraph breaks.

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:46:20 AM
On Being Dumb— Kenneth Goldsmith evades the real truth behind the vision of the world in which he lives. “Smart dumb” is only for the accidentally wealthy. It is not the world of those who worked with clenched teeth and calculating minds, “having sweated for what it’s accomplished” - his grandfather’s world perhaps - but only for those having been born to the rewards of that world. His grandfather’s world was “smart smart” and way too hard. His world is one where everything is easy and to be ironic is considered a calling. It takes a coddled and cultured upbringing with access to myriad musical genres to even know that Thelonious Monk had inserted “wrong notes.” This isn’t “going through smart to get to dumb,” it’s hypocrisy: living in infinite financial security while claiming to be self-made. It takes exposure to both “stuffy” museums, and modern galleries, to theater and poetry and lots and lots of time and lebensraum in which to reflect and rebel for a person to deconstruct John Cage or Gertrude Stein. It is the expansive mindset of those in a very cloistered world. In Mr. Goldsmith’s world everything is available so nothing has value. “A florescent tube leaned up against a wall is worth a million dollars …a plumbing fixture on a pedestal is considered the most important art work of the century.” It is a world of smugness. And Goldsmith has made it clear from the first sentence that he considers himself a prototypical icon of that group. Too clever, he believes, to work hard and flip enough to brag about it. A world where becoming poet laureate to the Museum of Modern Art came from rubbing elbows in Istanbul or Lech am Arlberg. It is a world oblivious to people outside his clique. Where words like compassion and humility are dredged up only for TED talks. Where donation to charity means lavish dinners (to which one arrives rumpled) and writing a check for the museum at which they are showing. Where glib articles promoting dumbness are written to Utne magazine. Mr. Goldsmith’s world is as cold as the jazz he admires, no doubt sardonically. It is a world without humanity. I pity him.

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:44:03 AM
On Being Dumb— Kenneth Goldsmith evades the real truth behind the vision of the world in which he lives. “Smart dumb” is only for the accidentally wealthy. It is not the world of those who worked with clenched teeth and calculating minds, “having sweated for what it’s accomplished” - his grandfather’s world perhaps - but only for those having been born to the rewards of that world. His grandfather’s world was “smart smart” and way too hard. His world is one where everything is easy and to be ironic is considered a calling. It takes a coddled and cultured upbringing with access to myriad musical genres to even know that Thelonious Monk had inserted “wrong notes.” This isn’t “going through smart to get to dumb,” it’s hypocrisy: living in infinite financial security while claiming to be self-made. It takes exposure to both “stuffy” museums, and modern galleries, to theater and poetry and lots and lots of time and lebensraum in which to reflect and rebel for a person to deconstruct John Cage or Gertrude Stein. It is the expansive mindset of those in a very cloistered world. In Mr. Goldsmith’s world everything is available so nothing has value. “A florescent tube leaned up against a wall is worth a million dollars …a plumbing fixture on a pedestal is considered the most important art work of the century.” It is a world of smugness. And Goldsmith has made it clear from the first sentence that he considers himself a prototypical icon of that group. Too clever, he believes, to work hard and flip enough to brag about it. A world where becoming poet laureate to the Museum of Modern Art came from rubbing elbows in Istanbul or Lech am Arlberg. It is a world oblivious to people outside his clique. Where words like compassion and humility are dredged up only for TED talks. Where donation to charity means lavish dinners (to which one arrives rumpled) and writing a check for the museum at which they are showing. Where glib articles promoting dumbness are written to Utne magazine. Mr. Goldsmith’s world is as cold as the jazz he admires, no doubt sardonically. It is a world without humanity. I pity him.





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