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Utne Reader Winter 2015

Table of Contents: Winter 2015

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Edible Education

Edible Education 

Dirty, Authentic ... Delicious!
Yelp, Mexican restaurants, and the appetites of Philadelphia's middle class
by Dylan Gottlieb, from Gastronomica

Gourmets
Oedipus complex is best served well-done
by Robert Anthony Siegel, from Tin House

Microeconomics and McDonald's
You can learn a surprising amount from the price of a Big Mac, fries, and a coke
by Robert Dorgan, from Fishwrap


The Future of Work

The Future of Work

We're Watching You Work
How workplace surveillance has become a menace to health and safety
by Jessica Bruder, from The Nation

Why You Should Join Our Startup
Beards, beer, and lots of bean bags
by Ryan Abbot, from The Syrup Trap

To Uber or Not to Uber
An Uber/Lyft driver learns there's nothing easy about easy money
by Kelly Dessaint, from Behind the Wheel 2


Bakken Boom

Bakken Boom

The Making of a Rich Man
How to cash in on a boomtown before it busts
by Melanie Hoffert, from Orion

Lost Frontier
The Badlands' most ardent defender wonders if it's time to leave
by Sierra Crane-Murdoch, from High Country News


Emerging Ideas

Emerging Ideas 

A Hard Look at How We See Race
Jennifer Eberhardt's research shows subconscious connections in people's minds between black faces and crime; law enforcement is taking note
by Sam Scott, from Standford Magazine

Home Sick
Family living near toxic gas compressor abandons house amid health concerns
by Jessica Cohen, special to Utne Reader

Microbial Me
Scientists are discovering how microbes not only make us sick but also keep our bodies working
by Lydialyle Gibson, from University of Chicago Magazine


Gleanings 

Gleanings 

International Type of Guy
Experimenting with new ways of speaking to one another
by Joseph Skibell, from My Father's Guitar


Mindful Living

Mindful Living

Appreciating Indigenous Ways of Knowing
It's time we reestablish our connection to a body of wisdom that values millennia of holistic experience and subjective observation
by Leigh Ann Henion, from Phenomenal

How to Live
Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh's simple advice for fully appreciating life
by Thich Nhat Hanh, from his Mindfulness Essentials Series


Mixed Media

Mixed Media

Nine Variations on the Idea of Street Music
If no one is really listening, who is the performance for?
by W. Scott Olsen, from North Dakota Quarterly

Want Smarter Students? Stop Teaching Math
A mathematician argues that we need to represent math as it once was: an art
by Michael S. Laufer, Ph.D., special to Utne Reader


Editor’s Note
by Christian Williams 

Forward 
by Eric Utne

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Post a comment below.

 

sandmadd
4/20/2015 12:53:19 PM
Re: Fade to White If it's true that China is destined to become the world's leading power in a generation or two, then maybe Asian-Americans will shift their identity to the winner across the Pacific. With the triumph of China, another scenario that may play out is a kind of double consciousness (to borrow W.E.B. Dubois' term) among Asian-Americans who identify with both Asia and America. The triumph of China may exacerbate the perception that Asian-Americans are 'the other' or perpetual foreigners. These are possibilities that can affect Asian-American assimilation.

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:46:59 AM
Sorry, your site won't let me include paragraph breaks.

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:46:20 AM
On Being Dumb— Kenneth Goldsmith evades the real truth behind the vision of the world in which he lives. “Smart dumb” is only for the accidentally wealthy. It is not the world of those who worked with clenched teeth and calculating minds, “having sweated for what it’s accomplished” - his grandfather’s world perhaps - but only for those having been born to the rewards of that world. His grandfather’s world was “smart smart” and way too hard. His world is one where everything is easy and to be ironic is considered a calling. It takes a coddled and cultured upbringing with access to myriad musical genres to even know that Thelonious Monk had inserted “wrong notes.” This isn’t “going through smart to get to dumb,” it’s hypocrisy: living in infinite financial security while claiming to be self-made. It takes exposure to both “stuffy” museums, and modern galleries, to theater and poetry and lots and lots of time and lebensraum in which to reflect and rebel for a person to deconstruct John Cage or Gertrude Stein. It is the expansive mindset of those in a very cloistered world. In Mr. Goldsmith’s world everything is available so nothing has value. “A florescent tube leaned up against a wall is worth a million dollars …a plumbing fixture on a pedestal is considered the most important art work of the century.” It is a world of smugness. And Goldsmith has made it clear from the first sentence that he considers himself a prototypical icon of that group. Too clever, he believes, to work hard and flip enough to brag about it. A world where becoming poet laureate to the Museum of Modern Art came from rubbing elbows in Istanbul or Lech am Arlberg. It is a world oblivious to people outside his clique. Where words like compassion and humility are dredged up only for TED talks. Where donation to charity means lavish dinners (to which one arrives rumpled) and writing a check for the museum at which they are showing. Where glib articles promoting dumbness are written to Utne magazine. Mr. Goldsmith’s world is as cold as the jazz he admires, no doubt sardonically. It is a world without humanity. I pity him.

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:44:03 AM
On Being Dumb— Kenneth Goldsmith evades the real truth behind the vision of the world in which he lives. “Smart dumb” is only for the accidentally wealthy. It is not the world of those who worked with clenched teeth and calculating minds, “having sweated for what it’s accomplished” - his grandfather’s world perhaps - but only for those having been born to the rewards of that world. His grandfather’s world was “smart smart” and way too hard. His world is one where everything is easy and to be ironic is considered a calling. It takes a coddled and cultured upbringing with access to myriad musical genres to even know that Thelonious Monk had inserted “wrong notes.” This isn’t “going through smart to get to dumb,” it’s hypocrisy: living in infinite financial security while claiming to be self-made. It takes exposure to both “stuffy” museums, and modern galleries, to theater and poetry and lots and lots of time and lebensraum in which to reflect and rebel for a person to deconstruct John Cage or Gertrude Stein. It is the expansive mindset of those in a very cloistered world. In Mr. Goldsmith’s world everything is available so nothing has value. “A florescent tube leaned up against a wall is worth a million dollars …a plumbing fixture on a pedestal is considered the most important art work of the century.” It is a world of smugness. And Goldsmith has made it clear from the first sentence that he considers himself a prototypical icon of that group. Too clever, he believes, to work hard and flip enough to brag about it. A world where becoming poet laureate to the Museum of Modern Art came from rubbing elbows in Istanbul or Lech am Arlberg. It is a world oblivious to people outside his clique. Where words like compassion and humility are dredged up only for TED talks. Where donation to charity means lavish dinners (to which one arrives rumpled) and writing a check for the museum at which they are showing. Where glib articles promoting dumbness are written to Utne magazine. Mr. Goldsmith’s world is as cold as the jazz he admires, no doubt sardonically. It is a world without humanity. I pity him.





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