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Utne Reader Spring 2016

Table of Contents: Spring 2016

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Black in America

Race 

The Battle of and for the Black Face Boy
by Nikky Finney, from Oxford American

Will Racism Ever End, Will I Ever Stop Being a Nigger?
A commentary on being Black in post-Obama America
by Kevin Powell, special to Utne Reader


Knowing How to Take a Stand

Knowing How to Take a Stand

Defusing the Politics of Anger
Productive activism starts with learning how to listen
by Nick Licata, excerpted from Becoming a Citizen Activist

Remembering How to Break the Rules
Being ready for the time when a rule is laid down that you cannot abide
by Raj Patel, from Justice Rising


Finding Peace

Finding Peace

My Intentional Community and the Law
A guide to coexisting with authority in order to live on your own terms
by Peter Moore, from Communities

A Quiet Subversion
With the right frame of mind you can find peace anywhere, anytime
by Leath Tonino, from Tricycle

Small Happiness
Finding happiness couldn't be more simple
by Sparrow, from The Sun


Emerging Ideas

Emerging Ideas 

Bee-Ware of Neonics
While the EPA drags its feet on regulating pesticides, local communities take action
by Nicole Rivard, from Action Line

Building with Culture in Mind
Adaptable floor plans aim to please the growing number of multicultural homebuyers
by Fernando Pagés Ruiz, from Shleterforce

The Second Racial Wealth Gap
White millennials can often rely on their parents for financial assistance. For many black and Hispanic millennials, it's the other way around
by Mel Jones, from Washington Monthly

American Primitive
Why our Stone Age brain struggles with the complexities of modern politics
by Chris Moody, from BookForum


Gleanings 

Gleanings 

Yours, Not Sitting on a Pumpkin
What can you offer the man who has it all? Trump finds out when he tries to buy Thoreau's cabin at Walden Pond
by Louis Phillips, from Smithsonian

A Gain
The schoolmarm gets schooled
by Charlie Geer, from The Threepenny Review

Entering and Breaking
How missing children can be simultaneously everywhere and nowhere
by Patrick Madden, from Sublime Physick


Mindful Living

Mindful Living

Spring Fever and Black Earth
Accepting an invitation to feel the living spirit of nature
by David Fideler, from Restoring the Soul of the World

Unbound: Religion Runs Free on the Internet
For those on the margins of faith, the internet is exploding notions of what religion can be
by Mary Valle, from CrossCurrents

Great Expectations
A look at the fascinating research into the power of the expectancy effect
by Jessica Cohen, special to Utne Reader


Mixed Media

Mixed Media

Why Live?
A Question for 21st-Century Theater
by Jordan Tannahill, from World Literature Today

Salons and Beyond
It's high time we start having civil, intelligent, face-to-face conversations again
by Stephanie Mills, from the Utne Reader archive


Editor’s Note
by Christian Williams 

Forward 
by Eric Utne

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Post a comment below.

 

Wolverine
3/17/2016 5:39:15 PM
http://nakeddeparture.com/2016/03/17/black-people-are-not-human/

sandmadd
4/20/2015 12:53:19 PM
Re: Fade to White If it's true that China is destined to become the world's leading power in a generation or two, then maybe Asian-Americans will shift their identity to the winner across the Pacific. With the triumph of China, another scenario that may play out is a kind of double consciousness (to borrow W.E.B. Dubois' term) among Asian-Americans who identify with both Asia and America. The triumph of China may exacerbate the perception that Asian-Americans are 'the other' or perpetual foreigners. These are possibilities that can affect Asian-American assimilation.

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:46:59 AM
Sorry, your site won't let me include paragraph breaks.

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:46:20 AM
On Being Dumb— Kenneth Goldsmith evades the real truth behind the vision of the world in which he lives. “Smart dumb” is only for the accidentally wealthy. It is not the world of those who worked with clenched teeth and calculating minds, “having sweated for what it’s accomplished” - his grandfather’s world perhaps - but only for those having been born to the rewards of that world. His grandfather’s world was “smart smart” and way too hard. His world is one where everything is easy and to be ironic is considered a calling. It takes a coddled and cultured upbringing with access to myriad musical genres to even know that Thelonious Monk had inserted “wrong notes.” This isn’t “going through smart to get to dumb,” it’s hypocrisy: living in infinite financial security while claiming to be self-made. It takes exposure to both “stuffy” museums, and modern galleries, to theater and poetry and lots and lots of time and lebensraum in which to reflect and rebel for a person to deconstruct John Cage or Gertrude Stein. It is the expansive mindset of those in a very cloistered world. In Mr. Goldsmith’s world everything is available so nothing has value. “A florescent tube leaned up against a wall is worth a million dollars …a plumbing fixture on a pedestal is considered the most important art work of the century.” It is a world of smugness. And Goldsmith has made it clear from the first sentence that he considers himself a prototypical icon of that group. Too clever, he believes, to work hard and flip enough to brag about it. A world where becoming poet laureate to the Museum of Modern Art came from rubbing elbows in Istanbul or Lech am Arlberg. It is a world oblivious to people outside his clique. Where words like compassion and humility are dredged up only for TED talks. Where donation to charity means lavish dinners (to which one arrives rumpled) and writing a check for the museum at which they are showing. Where glib articles promoting dumbness are written to Utne magazine. Mr. Goldsmith’s world is as cold as the jazz he admires, no doubt sardonically. It is a world without humanity. I pity him.

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:44:03 AM
On Being Dumb— Kenneth Goldsmith evades the real truth behind the vision of the world in which he lives. “Smart dumb” is only for the accidentally wealthy. It is not the world of those who worked with clenched teeth and calculating minds, “having sweated for what it’s accomplished” - his grandfather’s world perhaps - but only for those having been born to the rewards of that world. His grandfather’s world was “smart smart” and way too hard. His world is one where everything is easy and to be ironic is considered a calling. It takes a coddled and cultured upbringing with access to myriad musical genres to even know that Thelonious Monk had inserted “wrong notes.” This isn’t “going through smart to get to dumb,” it’s hypocrisy: living in infinite financial security while claiming to be self-made. It takes exposure to both “stuffy” museums, and modern galleries, to theater and poetry and lots and lots of time and lebensraum in which to reflect and rebel for a person to deconstruct John Cage or Gertrude Stein. It is the expansive mindset of those in a very cloistered world. In Mr. Goldsmith’s world everything is available so nothing has value. “A florescent tube leaned up against a wall is worth a million dollars …a plumbing fixture on a pedestal is considered the most important art work of the century.” It is a world of smugness. And Goldsmith has made it clear from the first sentence that he considers himself a prototypical icon of that group. Too clever, he believes, to work hard and flip enough to brag about it. A world where becoming poet laureate to the Museum of Modern Art came from rubbing elbows in Istanbul or Lech am Arlberg. It is a world oblivious to people outside his clique. Where words like compassion and humility are dredged up only for TED talks. Where donation to charity means lavish dinners (to which one arrives rumpled) and writing a check for the museum at which they are showing. Where glib articles promoting dumbness are written to Utne magazine. Mr. Goldsmith’s world is as cold as the jazz he admires, no doubt sardonically. It is a world without humanity. I pity him.





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