Add to My MSN


Table of Contents: Winter 2014

It's Still a Man's World

 

Inside Ghana's Witch Camps
When Ghanian women draw the ire of men, they risk ending up ostracized from their community by Francis Npong with additional reporting by Emily Rems, excerpted from Bust Magazine

The Silent Scourge
As Jordanian women leave the home and enter public life, sexual harassment has reached unprecedented levels of social acceptability by Elizabeth Whitman, from The Nation

Gender-Based Violence in United States Lacks a Constitutional Remedy
Jurisprudence demonstrates dire need for Equal Rights Amendment by Jessica Neuwirth, excerpted from Equal Means Equal


H2 Whoa


Experimental Road
When the beauty above hides the dangers lurking below by Mary Heather Noble, from Fourth Genre

How Dry I Am
Water is the most important resource on earth. So why don't reporters cover it? by Kate Galbraith, from Columbia Journalism Review


Consumer Children

Consumer Children

Targeting Children
Scrutinizing the motives behind Target's Library Makeover Program by Rachel Cloues, from Rethinking Schools

The Satori Generation
A new breed of young people have outdone the tricksters of advertising by Roland Kelts, from Adbusters


Emerging Ideas

Emerging Ideas 

What, Me Worry?
Why you should stop sweating everyday aggravations and embrace stress by Kristin Sainani, from Stanford

The Future of Food
Reckless chicken, a brave new smoothie, and test-tube meat by Tom King, special to Utne Reader


Gleanings 

Gleanings 

An Arrangement of Skin
How the act of looking can help beat back the seductive lethargy of death by Anna Journey, from Agni

Finalists for the 2014 Utne Poetry Contest
Readers are invited to select their favorite in online poll

"Life Inside the Oil Boom"
An excerpt from Utne Digital


Mindful Living

Mindful living

Climate Change: The Bigger Picture
A challenge to our obsession with climate change at the expense of all other values by Charles Eisenstein, from Resurgence & Ecologist


Mixed Media

Mixed Media

The Zen Master of the Social Network
A closer look at the mystifying correspondence art by Tim Keane, special to Utne Reader

What Brings You Here?
A caretaker's view of the William S. Burroughs centenary in Lawrence, Kansas by Tom King, special to Utne Reader


Reviews:

Film
Inside the Mind of a Master: a review of Eraserhead (Criterion Collection release)
An Unlikely Freedom Fighter: a review of Point and Shoot

Music
Church Music That Will Move the Unbeliever: a review of Get In Union by Bessie Jones and the Georgia Sea Island Singers
Music for Dance: a review of Atomos by A Winged Victory for the Sullen
Lost and Found: a review of Tche Belew by Hailu Mergia & the Walias
He's Still Got It: Jaiyede Afro by Orlando Julius and the Heliocentrics

Books
Whatever Happened to Bobbie Gentry: a review of Ode to Billie Joe by Tara Murtha
The Illustrated Cosmos: a review of Cosmigraphics: Picturing Space Through Time by Michael Benson
Real-Time with History's Critics: a review of Insurrections of the Mind edited by Franklin Foer
Capitalism and Climate Change: a review of This Changes Everything by Naomi Klein
That Which Must Be Spoken: a review of Unspeakable Things by Laurie Penny


Editor’s Note
by Christian Williams 

Forward 
by Eric Utne





Post a comment below.

 

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:46:59 AM
Sorry, your site won't let me include paragraph breaks.

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:46:20 AM
On Being Dumb— Kenneth Goldsmith evades the real truth behind the vision of the world in which he lives. “Smart dumb” is only for the accidentally wealthy. It is not the world of those who worked with clenched teeth and calculating minds, “having sweated for what it’s accomplished” - his grandfather’s world perhaps - but only for those having been born to the rewards of that world. His grandfather’s world was “smart smart” and way too hard. His world is one where everything is easy and to be ironic is considered a calling. It takes a coddled and cultured upbringing with access to myriad musical genres to even know that Thelonious Monk had inserted “wrong notes.” This isn’t “going through smart to get to dumb,” it’s hypocrisy: living in infinite financial security while claiming to be self-made. It takes exposure to both “stuffy” museums, and modern galleries, to theater and poetry and lots and lots of time and lebensraum in which to reflect and rebel for a person to deconstruct John Cage or Gertrude Stein. It is the expansive mindset of those in a very cloistered world. In Mr. Goldsmith’s world everything is available so nothing has value. “A florescent tube leaned up against a wall is worth a million dollars …a plumbing fixture on a pedestal is considered the most important art work of the century.” It is a world of smugness. And Goldsmith has made it clear from the first sentence that he considers himself a prototypical icon of that group. Too clever, he believes, to work hard and flip enough to brag about it. A world where becoming poet laureate to the Museum of Modern Art came from rubbing elbows in Istanbul or Lech am Arlberg. It is a world oblivious to people outside his clique. Where words like compassion and humility are dredged up only for TED talks. Where donation to charity means lavish dinners (to which one arrives rumpled) and writing a check for the museum at which they are showing. Where glib articles promoting dumbness are written to Utne magazine. Mr. Goldsmith’s world is as cold as the jazz he admires, no doubt sardonically. It is a world without humanity. I pity him.

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:44:03 AM
On Being Dumb— Kenneth Goldsmith evades the real truth behind the vision of the world in which he lives. “Smart dumb” is only for the accidentally wealthy. It is not the world of those who worked with clenched teeth and calculating minds, “having sweated for what it’s accomplished” - his grandfather’s world perhaps - but only for those having been born to the rewards of that world. His grandfather’s world was “smart smart” and way too hard. His world is one where everything is easy and to be ironic is considered a calling. It takes a coddled and cultured upbringing with access to myriad musical genres to even know that Thelonious Monk had inserted “wrong notes.” This isn’t “going through smart to get to dumb,” it’s hypocrisy: living in infinite financial security while claiming to be self-made. It takes exposure to both “stuffy” museums, and modern galleries, to theater and poetry and lots and lots of time and lebensraum in which to reflect and rebel for a person to deconstruct John Cage or Gertrude Stein. It is the expansive mindset of those in a very cloistered world. In Mr. Goldsmith’s world everything is available so nothing has value. “A florescent tube leaned up against a wall is worth a million dollars …a plumbing fixture on a pedestal is considered the most important art work of the century.” It is a world of smugness. And Goldsmith has made it clear from the first sentence that he considers himself a prototypical icon of that group. Too clever, he believes, to work hard and flip enough to brag about it. A world where becoming poet laureate to the Museum of Modern Art came from rubbing elbows in Istanbul or Lech am Arlberg. It is a world oblivious to people outside his clique. Where words like compassion and humility are dredged up only for TED talks. Where donation to charity means lavish dinners (to which one arrives rumpled) and writing a check for the museum at which they are showing. Where glib articles promoting dumbness are written to Utne magazine. Mr. Goldsmith’s world is as cold as the jazz he admires, no doubt sardonically. It is a world without humanity. I pity him.





Pay Now & Save $5!
First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here

Want to gain a fresh perspective? Read stories that matter? Feel optimistic about the future? It's all here! Utne Reader offers provocative writing from diverse perspectives, insightful analysis of art and media, down-to-earth news and in-depth coverage of eye-opening issues that affect your life.

Save Even More Money By Paying NOW!

Pay now with a credit card and take advantage of our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. You save an additional $5 and get 4 issues of Utne Reader for only $31.00 (USA only).

Or Bill Me Later and pay just $36 for 4 issues of Utne Reader!