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Summer 2014 Utne Cover

Table of Contents: Summer 2014

Population Growth

 

The End of the Green Revolution
In the battle against hunger, increased food production is only half the answer by Alan Weisman, excerpted from Countdown

TV as Birth Control
When TV ownership rises, fertility falls by Fred Pearce, from Conservation


A Tale of Two Cities

Business on the border of Menlo Park and East Palo Alto

Silicon Chasm
The class divide on America’s cutting edge by Charlotte Allen, from The Weekly Standard

LA Story
Bringing progressivism back to the city by Harold Meyerson, from The American Prospect


Emerging Ideas

 

Feminism’s Toxic Twitter Wars
How endless finger-pointing brings everyone down by Michelle Goldberg, from The Nation

A Toast Story
The profound and heartbreaking story behind the latest artisanal food craze by John Gravois, from Pacific Standard


Gleanings 

The cupcake tramp stamp 

Ammunition
Guns, love, and coming out by Bruce Snider, from The Iowa Review

I’ll Take the Tramp Stamp with Sprinkles
Who knew a cupcake tattoo could mean so much? by Shell Feijo, from Hip Mama

Even In My Dreams She Leaves Me Every Time
How do we let go of the ones we’re not ready to lose? by Hilary Zaid, from Lilith

Answers
The inner life of a contented newborn by Robert Long Foreman, from Pleiades

Mindful Living

An art car at burning Man

Dharma on the Playa
A psychedelic emergency room where Burners can care for their own by Allan Badiner, from Tricycle

Why Do We Procrastinate?
Our future selves are people, too by Alisa Opar, from Nautilus


Mixed Media

Nature’s Artists
Finding a link between beauty and biology by David Rothernberg, from Resurgence & Ecologist

And She Was
The story of the greatest girl group you’ve never heard of by Lindsay Zoladz, from Bitch

Facts and Truth
Walking the fine line of creative nonfiction by Willian Bradley, special to Utne Reader


Reviews:

Film
To the Stars Through the Mind: a Review of A Brief History of Time: Criterion Collection
More Than Just Identity: a review of Who is Dayani Cristal?
Stuck Between Mill Stones: a review of Burning Bush

Music
A Journey as Wonderful as the Arrival: a review of Are We There by Sharon Von Etten
Lonely but Happy: a review of Abandoned City by Hauschka

Books
Prepare for the Foraging Revolution: a review of Foraging & Feasting: A Field Guide and Wild Food Cookbook by Dina Falconi
The World is Watching: a review of Words Will Break Cement: The Passion of Pussy Riot by Masha Gessen
Inside the Numbers: a review of Black Stats: African Americans By the Numbers in the Twenty-First Century by Monique W. Morris


Editor’s Note
by Christian Williams 

Forward 
by Eric Utne


Dispatches from: 
Spirituality & Health (Healing Power of the Mind)
Futurity (The Blood Bank's Fishy Solution)
Current Biology (Your Brain on Video Games)





Post a comment below.

 

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:46:59 AM
Sorry, your site won't let me include paragraph breaks.

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:46:20 AM
On Being Dumb— Kenneth Goldsmith evades the real truth behind the vision of the world in which he lives. “Smart dumb” is only for the accidentally wealthy. It is not the world of those who worked with clenched teeth and calculating minds, “having sweated for what it’s accomplished” - his grandfather’s world perhaps - but only for those having been born to the rewards of that world. His grandfather’s world was “smart smart” and way too hard. His world is one where everything is easy and to be ironic is considered a calling. It takes a coddled and cultured upbringing with access to myriad musical genres to even know that Thelonious Monk had inserted “wrong notes.” This isn’t “going through smart to get to dumb,” it’s hypocrisy: living in infinite financial security while claiming to be self-made. It takes exposure to both “stuffy” museums, and modern galleries, to theater and poetry and lots and lots of time and lebensraum in which to reflect and rebel for a person to deconstruct John Cage or Gertrude Stein. It is the expansive mindset of those in a very cloistered world. In Mr. Goldsmith’s world everything is available so nothing has value. “A florescent tube leaned up against a wall is worth a million dollars …a plumbing fixture on a pedestal is considered the most important art work of the century.” It is a world of smugness. And Goldsmith has made it clear from the first sentence that he considers himself a prototypical icon of that group. Too clever, he believes, to work hard and flip enough to brag about it. A world where becoming poet laureate to the Museum of Modern Art came from rubbing elbows in Istanbul or Lech am Arlberg. It is a world oblivious to people outside his clique. Where words like compassion and humility are dredged up only for TED talks. Where donation to charity means lavish dinners (to which one arrives rumpled) and writing a check for the museum at which they are showing. Where glib articles promoting dumbness are written to Utne magazine. Mr. Goldsmith’s world is as cold as the jazz he admires, no doubt sardonically. It is a world without humanity. I pity him.

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:44:03 AM
On Being Dumb— Kenneth Goldsmith evades the real truth behind the vision of the world in which he lives. “Smart dumb” is only for the accidentally wealthy. It is not the world of those who worked with clenched teeth and calculating minds, “having sweated for what it’s accomplished” - his grandfather’s world perhaps - but only for those having been born to the rewards of that world. His grandfather’s world was “smart smart” and way too hard. His world is one where everything is easy and to be ironic is considered a calling. It takes a coddled and cultured upbringing with access to myriad musical genres to even know that Thelonious Monk had inserted “wrong notes.” This isn’t “going through smart to get to dumb,” it’s hypocrisy: living in infinite financial security while claiming to be self-made. It takes exposure to both “stuffy” museums, and modern galleries, to theater and poetry and lots and lots of time and lebensraum in which to reflect and rebel for a person to deconstruct John Cage or Gertrude Stein. It is the expansive mindset of those in a very cloistered world. In Mr. Goldsmith’s world everything is available so nothing has value. “A florescent tube leaned up against a wall is worth a million dollars …a plumbing fixture on a pedestal is considered the most important art work of the century.” It is a world of smugness. And Goldsmith has made it clear from the first sentence that he considers himself a prototypical icon of that group. Too clever, he believes, to work hard and flip enough to brag about it. A world where becoming poet laureate to the Museum of Modern Art came from rubbing elbows in Istanbul or Lech am Arlberg. It is a world oblivious to people outside his clique. Where words like compassion and humility are dredged up only for TED talks. Where donation to charity means lavish dinners (to which one arrives rumpled) and writing a check for the museum at which they are showing. Where glib articles promoting dumbness are written to Utne magazine. Mr. Goldsmith’s world is as cold as the jazz he admires, no doubt sardonically. It is a world without humanity. I pity him.





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