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Utne Cover Summer 2016

Table of Contents: Summer 2016

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Every One of Us: Equal

Equal

Letter to a Young Man
by Kevin Powell, special to Utne Reader

The Trans Revolution
Tracking the course of transgender rights and their liberating potential for us all
By Vanessa Baird, from New Internationalist

Repairing the Circle
What we can learn from the definitions of gender in Indigenous mythology
By Tomson Highway, from Masculindians


Inhumane Incarceration

Incarceration

No Place for Old Men
Texas prisons are filling up with the old and the ill—at enormous expense
by Dick J. Reavis

Solitary and Supermaxes
A closer look at the latest U.S. export to Brazil—the supermax prison system
By Baz Dreisinger, from Incarceration Nations


Exercising Compassion

Compassion

Choosing Love
A mother explains how she has reacted to her son’s murder
By Scarlett Lewis, from Resurgence & Ecologist

On Course for Compassion
Mindfulness is not enough—we must develop our capacity for altruism
by Christine Toomy from Resurgence & Ecologist

What Keeps Us from Being Kinder to Ourselves?
Busting the five myths of self-compassion
by Kristin Neff, from Psychotherapy Networker


Emerging Ideas

Emerging

Empowering Communities
Michael Sussman’s empowerment centers are helping communities band together and step up where social services fall short.
by Jessica Cohen, special to Utne Reader

Power Politics
Understanding the GOP’s civil war over off-the-grid energy
by Josiah Neely, from The American Conservative

The See Change
Huge advances in virtual reality are challenging the nature of experience
by Sam Scott, from Stanford


Gleanings 

Gleanings

Gone Astray
Values fall by the wayside for a humanitarian aid worker in Sri Lanka
by Satya Doyle Byock, from Oregon Humanities

Living with the Dead
Inside the underground tombs that have become shelter for war-ravaged Syrian civilians
by Francesa Borri, from Syrian Dust

Beautiful Monsters
Ruminating on life with a prosthetic limb
by Emily Rapp, from From Curlers to Chainsaws


Mindful Living

Mindful

Naked: Triptych
Recognizing the grace of vulnerability
by Shannon Huffman Polson, from Ruminate Magazine

Moving the Goalposts
What Cleve Backster’s research into plant intelligence reveals about the attunement of living things
by Derrick Jensen from The Myth of Human Supremacy

Psychedelics and Systems Change
Prohibitionists are correct: The legalization of psychoactive drugs and psychedelics would indeed mean the end of society as we know it … and that’s a good thing.
by Charles Eisenstein, from Maps Bulletin


Mixed Media

Mixed Media

Folk Artists vs. the State
Truckhenge, Bishop Castle, the Garden of Eden, and the anti-authoritarianism of outsider art
by Reecy Pontiff, from Reason

Plus: Music, film, and book reviews


Editor’s Note
by Christian Williams 

Forward 
by Eric Utne

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Post a comment below.

 

Wolverine
3/17/2016 5:39:15 PM
http://nakeddeparture.com/2016/03/17/black-people-are-not-human/

sandmadd
4/20/2015 12:53:19 PM
Re: Fade to White If it's true that China is destined to become the world's leading power in a generation or two, then maybe Asian-Americans will shift their identity to the winner across the Pacific. With the triumph of China, another scenario that may play out is a kind of double consciousness (to borrow W.E.B. Dubois' term) among Asian-Americans who identify with both Asia and America. The triumph of China may exacerbate the perception that Asian-Americans are 'the other' or perpetual foreigners. These are possibilities that can affect Asian-American assimilation.

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:46:59 AM
Sorry, your site won't let me include paragraph breaks.

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:46:20 AM
On Being Dumb— Kenneth Goldsmith evades the real truth behind the vision of the world in which he lives. “Smart dumb” is only for the accidentally wealthy. It is not the world of those who worked with clenched teeth and calculating minds, “having sweated for what it’s accomplished” - his grandfather’s world perhaps - but only for those having been born to the rewards of that world. His grandfather’s world was “smart smart” and way too hard. His world is one where everything is easy and to be ironic is considered a calling. It takes a coddled and cultured upbringing with access to myriad musical genres to even know that Thelonious Monk had inserted “wrong notes.” This isn’t “going through smart to get to dumb,” it’s hypocrisy: living in infinite financial security while claiming to be self-made. It takes exposure to both “stuffy” museums, and modern galleries, to theater and poetry and lots and lots of time and lebensraum in which to reflect and rebel for a person to deconstruct John Cage or Gertrude Stein. It is the expansive mindset of those in a very cloistered world. In Mr. Goldsmith’s world everything is available so nothing has value. “A florescent tube leaned up against a wall is worth a million dollars …a plumbing fixture on a pedestal is considered the most important art work of the century.” It is a world of smugness. And Goldsmith has made it clear from the first sentence that he considers himself a prototypical icon of that group. Too clever, he believes, to work hard and flip enough to brag about it. A world where becoming poet laureate to the Museum of Modern Art came from rubbing elbows in Istanbul or Lech am Arlberg. It is a world oblivious to people outside his clique. Where words like compassion and humility are dredged up only for TED talks. Where donation to charity means lavish dinners (to which one arrives rumpled) and writing a check for the museum at which they are showing. Where glib articles promoting dumbness are written to Utne magazine. Mr. Goldsmith’s world is as cold as the jazz he admires, no doubt sardonically. It is a world without humanity. I pity him.

QuinnMontana
11/5/2013 11:44:03 AM
On Being Dumb— Kenneth Goldsmith evades the real truth behind the vision of the world in which he lives. “Smart dumb” is only for the accidentally wealthy. It is not the world of those who worked with clenched teeth and calculating minds, “having sweated for what it’s accomplished” - his grandfather’s world perhaps - but only for those having been born to the rewards of that world. His grandfather’s world was “smart smart” and way too hard. His world is one where everything is easy and to be ironic is considered a calling. It takes a coddled and cultured upbringing with access to myriad musical genres to even know that Thelonious Monk had inserted “wrong notes.” This isn’t “going through smart to get to dumb,” it’s hypocrisy: living in infinite financial security while claiming to be self-made. It takes exposure to both “stuffy” museums, and modern galleries, to theater and poetry and lots and lots of time and lebensraum in which to reflect and rebel for a person to deconstruct John Cage or Gertrude Stein. It is the expansive mindset of those in a very cloistered world. In Mr. Goldsmith’s world everything is available so nothing has value. “A florescent tube leaned up against a wall is worth a million dollars …a plumbing fixture on a pedestal is considered the most important art work of the century.” It is a world of smugness. And Goldsmith has made it clear from the first sentence that he considers himself a prototypical icon of that group. Too clever, he believes, to work hard and flip enough to brag about it. A world where becoming poet laureate to the Museum of Modern Art came from rubbing elbows in Istanbul or Lech am Arlberg. It is a world oblivious to people outside his clique. Where words like compassion and humility are dredged up only for TED talks. Where donation to charity means lavish dinners (to which one arrives rumpled) and writing a check for the museum at which they are showing. Where glib articles promoting dumbness are written to Utne magazine. Mr. Goldsmith’s world is as cold as the jazz he admires, no doubt sardonically. It is a world without humanity. I pity him.





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